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thinkALONG! 5 September

A TUESDAY FEATURE

hosts: Muskaan Ahuja, Lakshmi Iyer

guest editor: Vandana Parashar


Please note:


Only the unpublished poems (that are never published on any social media platform/journals/anthologies) posted here for each prompt will be considered for Triveni Haikai India's monthly journal -- haikuKATHA, each month.


Poets are requested to post poems that adhere to the prompts/exercises given.


Only 1 poem to be posted in 24 hours. Total 2 poems per poet are allowed each week (numbered 1,2). So, revise your poems till 'words obey your call'.


If a poet wants feedback, then the poet must mention 'feedback welcome' below each poem that is being posted.


Responses are usually a mixture of grain and chaff. The poet has to be discerning about what to take for the final version of the poem or the unedited version will be picked up for the journal.


The final version should be on top of the original version for selection.


Poetry is a serious business. Give you best attempt to feature in haikuKATHA !!


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In his essay "Haiku Becoming", Cor van den Heuvel has quoted Professor Harold G. Henderson who once wrote, in effect, that haiku in English would beçome whatever the haiku poets make it and thus implying that haiku is a growing, living thing. He laments yet there always seem to be some people who want to put living things in cages, or bonsai pots.


Do you agree with Prof Henderson that haiku should evolve and encourage experimentation or do you think that we should stick to the traditions and not deviate from what was originally propounded by the masters?


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58 Comments


mona bedi
mona bedi
Sep 14, 2023

Post #1


crepuscular hours

my longing

colored indigo


Feedback appreciated:)

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Lev Hart
Lev Hart
Sep 11, 2023

Re: ". . . haiku in English would beçome whatever the haiku poets make it and thus implying that haiku is a growing, living thing."


I am reminded of Basho's description of karumi:


"Basho's work was heavily influenced by Zen Buddhism. In particular, by karumi

which literally means 'lightness'. He famously declared that: 'a good poem is one

in which the form of the verse and the joining of its parts seem light as a shallow

river flowing over its sandy bed'."


Both the river and the sandy bed are ever-changing, like English-language haiku and the original tradition. All three are --- poetically speaking --- alive.

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Vandana Parashar
Vandana Parashar
Sep 11, 2023
Replying to

Well put, Lev. Thanks! 🙏

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marilyn ashbaugh
marilyn ashbaugh
Sep 11, 2023

#1 10/9/23 feedback welcome


corn cribs

woodbind greens

the emptiness

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marilyn ashbaugh
marilyn ashbaugh
Sep 09, 2023

Great discussion question, Vandana! There are many “schools” of haiku and it can be confusing. I was adrift until I anchored here at Triveni.

As Kala eloquently says, the haikai river of creativity flows freely, but always between two banks. Which banks a poet chooses may change over time. My banks began traditionally: 5/7/5, phrase/fragment, kigo, cut. This foundation served me well and although I no longer rigidly follow these, they live within me, and I continue to learn from them.


When Kala, in haikaiTalks, began the study of Japanese aesthetics with mono no aware, I felt a new riverbank for my haiku study. This is/was an intuitive leaning that felt right, especially within this supportive community.


In the end,…

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Vandana Parashar
Vandana Parashar
Sep 11, 2023
Replying to

What a beautiful comment, Marilyn! Thank you for being a part of Triveni.🙏

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Lev Hart
Lev Hart
Sep 09, 2023

Post #3


Issa coaches

a snail to climb Mt. Fuji ---

I lead the cheers


["snail" is a summer kigo. feedback welcome.]


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