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writeALONG!

A TUESDAY FEATURE

host: Muskaan Ahuja

guest editor: Srinivasa Rao


Three Elements in Haiku

(Taken from Kenneth Yasuda’s Japanese Haiku, Its Essential Nature and History)



The haiku poet usually attempts to present a speaking object, around which and in which he has had an experience; and this in a breath-length’s space. There are certain basic attributes of an object which serve to identify it and locate it amidst the constant barrage of impressions which impinge on consciousness. Objects, that is to say, are located in time and space. Let’s take an actual experience of a poet. Basho, let us say, was passing through a field one autumn evening and a crow on branch caught his attention. Similar scenes had doubtlessly been seen many people before him, but he is the one who made it a memorable event by forming his experience of it in the following haiku:



On a withered bough

A crow alone is perching

Autumn evening now



For him, a bough (where), a crow (what) and the evening (when) are the three elements that he recorded in three lines


This week, go out and look into the surroundings, find the three elements and write a haiku/senryu. The poet must see how the three elements exist, in one, as parts of a whole without which they do not become an experience but only remain in relationship to each other. If we examine well-realized haiku, we will see that three elements are so unified that they are immovable and that no substitute is possible. Where, what and when need not be in that order as long as the unification creates a memory.



My own published examples:


1.


Indian summer— (when)

the palmist's fingers (what)

on her love line (where)




2.


graveyard watch (where)

the rhythm of winter (when)

in the old man's teeth (what)


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121 Comments


angiola inglese
angiola inglese
Dec 04, 2022

unsold roses

on the market stall

cold wind


unsold roses on the market stall cold wind

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angiola inglese
angiola inglese
Dec 05, 2022
Replying to

ok, thank you .


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angiola inglese
angiola inglese
Dec 04, 2022

song of summer-

on the sunny beach

fresh coconut


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angiola inglese
angiola inglese
Dec 05, 2022
Replying to

Thank you.


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Muskaan Ahuja
Muskaan Ahuja
Dec 04, 2022

Srinivasa,


Thanks for bringing everyone together with their beautiful poems! Your contribution to *thinkALONG* is applaudable!



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Srinivas Sambangi
Srinivas Sambangi
Dec 04, 2022
Replying to

Thank you so much Muskaan, for giving me this opportunity to interact with many poets

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the bare bones

of a wood pigeon’s nest

left for the wind


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Srinivas Sambangi
Srinivas Sambangi
Dec 04, 2022
Replying to

Very nice

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#3 feedback welcome


snowflakes - in the new home, her abandoned flaws

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Replying to

Thank you!

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