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haikaiTALKS Q 29: a saturday gathering



*** Q #29 ***

************


haikaiTALKS Q #29: a saturday gathering_under the banyan tree

host: Kala Ramesh


Hearty Congratulations, to Vidya Shankar!

Mona Bedi has picked Vidya’s answer as the best reply to her Q!


For the last discission, click here:

https://www.trivenihaikai.in/post/haikaitalks-q-28-a-saturday-gathering


Dear Kala,


Thank you for letting me know that Mona has picked my answer as the best to her question. Thank you, Mona, for that question. And thank you, Lakshmi, for guiding me to the question.


Kala, here is my question for this week.


With haiku crossing borders, not just geographical but going beyond traditional Japanese kigo, I keep coming across a lot of terms that come from a poet's native, the association of which may be lost to certain sections of readers.


As a free-verse poet, I would often bring elements of Indian culture into my poems. But I do not know how to do that with haiku, so I have hardly done that.


Let me share a couple of examples with you where I have used Indian, more specifically, South Indian terms.


In one of my haiku (which is still waiting to be edited and hence not sharing it here entirely), I used the term 'kani konna'. Kala suggested I change it to 'kani konna blossom' so that readers will not have to Google it. I remembered this piece of advice when I wrote the following haiku:


sampangi garlands...

a bee sings

an invocation


(published in THF, Haiku Dialogue - The Language of Flowers, June 1, 2022)


Sometimes it is not possible to bring about such hints in a verse and the poet might have to provide footnotes. But I understand that footnotes, like resorting to Google, are not often encouraged. And reasonably so, for haiku is all about simplicity and being in the moment and footnotes and Google searches can sometimes take away the aha moment of the verse.


My question is:


Have you used a term that is unique to your geographical/native location? How have you brought about its significance in your haiku, at least in a small way, without you having to provide footnotes or the reader having to run to Google? Have you also written haiku where you have provided footnotes that do not disrupt the aha effect of your poem?


Thank you once again, Kala, for the opportunity.


Love,

Vidya Shankar


……..


Trivenians are given time until midnight of 18th JUNE (IST) - two weeks because I want our poets to think about this Q. And to share your poems and comments on this topic.


Waiting to read your responses!

your host,

_kala


183 views19 comments

19 Comments


Kala Ramesh
Kala Ramesh
Jun 16, 2022

Dear all,


Thinking of giving this feature a small break ... for with RENKU going on in full swing and our other features too - looks like our poets don't have time to get here.

Please share your ideas and views on this. Waiting ...

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lakshmi iyer
lakshmi iyer
Jun 18, 2022
Replying to

Yes, even I felt so. I feel bad I myself couldn't write here. This is a wonderful feature, either we can keep this as it is or think of something different Under the Banyan!

We need to have more poets coming here. Thank you so much.

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Kala Ramesh
Kala Ramesh
Jun 07, 2022

Hearty Congratulations to our Contributors! The list of poets featured in haikuKATHA - Issue 8, June 2022 is up! https://www.trivenihaikai.in/post/celebration

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Kala Ramesh
Kala Ramesh
Jun 06, 2022


TRIVENI HAIKAI INDIA BOOK LAUNCH

the field of why

by SHLOKA SHANKAR

check the details here: https://www.trivenihaikai.in/post/celebration

poster designed by Teji Sethi

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Kala Ramesh
Kala Ramesh
Jun 06, 2022

Good Q, Vidya. Using Indian words in haiku has been done before but remember only a few poets were writing before I came in 2005.

Dr Angelee Deodhar, Dr Johannes Manjrekar, Prof R. K. Singh and K. Ramesh. Now that so many Indians are practising and writing and publishing haiku - we can and should use Indian words - for it does bring an Indian feel to the ku and haiku being an experiential poem speaks of truth. That having said - what I've been advocating is this: if I use two Tamizh words in a 9 word-poem - even many Indians who don't know Tamizh won't be able to appreciate my poem. One is fine.


Asahi:

Kala Ramesh refers to…


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Billie Dee
Billie Dee
Jun 23, 2022
Replying to

godhuli


Wow, there's a single word meaning all that?! And I thought German was complicated. Thanks for this excellent article. I learn so much here.


---Billie, Kiku Makura

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Kavitha Sreeraj
Kavitha Sreeraj
Jun 05, 2022

Dear Vidya


Congratulations 🎉! I loved your question as it's relevant.


Many at times I am tempted to use words with native references in my ku and use foot notes only if its not in English. I remember Kala mentioning that if you have to explain your ku then it is not strong. I always keep that in mind.


If the word is specific to a culture/language/native and needs explanation, I do it.


This ku was a part of linked verse attempted along with Vani and published in failedhaiku


visit to attic . . .

a faint smell of thazhampoo

from the trunk box


Note...

*Thazhampoo or the screw pine flower is known for its fragrance. In olden days the…


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Kala Ramesh
Kala Ramesh
Jun 05, 2022
Replying to

Beautiful. Even I didn't know 'thazhampoo' was used as a freshener. Nice one.

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